• German course for beginners
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  • 1 The German alphabet [0/2]
  • 2 German greetings (Hello in German) [0/3]
  • 3 Introduction in german (talking about yourself) [0/2]
  • 4 Counting in German (cardinal and ordinal numbers) [0/3]
  • 5 The Time in German (hours and minutes in German) [0/3]
  • 6 Days of the weeks, months and seasons in German [0/3]
  • 7 Colours in German (blue, green, yellow...) [0/3]
  • 8 Asking for directions in German [0/3]
  • 9 The weather in German (sun, rain, temperature...) [0/3]
  • 10 Family members in German (parents, siblings...) [0/3]
  • 11 Body parts in German [0/3]
  • 12 Countries in German (Europe, Asia, Africa, America) [0/5]
  • 13 Ordering in Germany (restaurant, waiter, dinner) [0/3]
  • 14 German travel phrases [0/3]
  • 15 Grocery shopping in Germany [0/3]
  • 16 German proverbs [0/3]
  • 17 Animal names in German (pets, mammals, birds, ...) [0/4]
  • 18 Clothing in German (shoes, accessories, ...) [0/2]
  • 19 Happy birthday in German (parties and congratulations) [0/3]
  • 20 I love you in German (emotions and feedback) [0/3]
  • 21 Needs and opinions in German (polite requests) [0/4]
  • 22 Hobbies in German (sports and games) [0/3]
  • 23 House, room, furniture vocabulary in German [0/3]
  • 24 Descriptions in German (appearance and characteristics) [0/5]
  • 25 Business vocabulary in German (work and negotiations) [0/3]
  • 26 Going to the doctor and health vocabulary in German [0/3]
  • 27 School vocabulary in German (subjects and persons) [0/3]
  • 28 Places of interest German (post office, infrastructure) [0/3]
  • 29 Nature words in German (parks and outdoor) [0/2]
  • Counting in German (cardinal and ordinal numbers)

    How do you say the numbers in German?

    In this chapter I will teach you how to count in German! We are starting with the numbers from 1-20 and, by end of this chapter, you should be able to count till 1000! Have fun! 

    Cardinal numbers in German

    Numbers in German: 1-20

    The numbers untill 12 are not following any system - same as in English. You just have to study and memorize them!

    The numbers from 13 untill 19 are formed almost the same way as in English:

    • In front of the number zehn (=ten), you have to put the corresponding number from one to nine 
    • Example: The number 13 is called dreizehn. If you pay attention, you can litterally see that dreizehn is the combination of drei (3) + zehn (10)

    Listen to the numbers from 1 to 20 in a row: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

    1 eins
    2 zwei
    3 drei
    4 vier
    5 fünf
    sechs
    7 sieben
    8 acht
    9 neun
    10 zehn                  
    11 elf
    12 zwölf
    13 dreizehn
    14 vierzehn
    15 fünfzehn
    16 sechzehn
    17 siebzehn
    18 achtzehn
    19 neunzehn
    20 zwanzig

     

    Numbers in German up to 100

    The numbers from 21 till 99 are build in a similar way as the numbers from 13 till 19.

    • Example: The number 22 is called zweiundzwanzig. You are not starting as in English with the bigger number (in this case: zwanzig/twenty), but with the smaller number (in this case: zwei/two). The two numbers are connected with und (=and).

    Listen to the numbers of the following list in one row: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 40, 42, 50, 53, 60, 64, 70, 75, 80, 86, 90, 97, 100

    21   einundzwanzig                 
    22 zweiundzwanzig
    23 dreiundzwanzig
    24 vierundzwanzig
    25 fünfundzwanzig
    26 sechsundzwanzig
    27 siebenundzwanzig
    28 achtundzwanzig
    29 neunundzwanzig
    30 dreißig
    31 einunddreißig
    40 vierzig
    42 zweiundvierzig
    50 fünfzig
    53 dreiundfünfzig
    60 sechzig
    64 vierundsechzig
    70 siebzig
    75 fünfundsiebzig
    80 achtzig
    86 sechsundachtzig
    90 neunzig
    97 siebenundneunzig
    100 einhundert

     

    Counting in German: 1-1000

    Building the numbers with hundred, you just have to add the corresponding number to the number with hundred (without und).

    •  For example: 101 is called hunderteins, so first you have to put the hundred number and after that the rest of the numbers.

    Listen to the numbers of the following list in one row: 101, 179, 200, 224, 300, 320, 400, 402, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 2000, 10000, 100000, 1000000

    101 einhunderteins
    179 einhundertneunundsiebzig
    200 zweihundert
    224 zweihundertvierundzwanzig
    300 dreihundert
    320 dreihundertzwanzig
    400 vierhundert
    402 vierhundertzwei
    500 fünfhundert
    600 sechshundert
    700 siebenhundert
    800 achthundert
    900 neunhundert
    1000 eintausend
    2000 zweitausend
    10.000 zehntausend
    100.000 hunderttausend
    1.000.000 eine Million

     

    Ordinal numbers in German

    There is also another form of numbers: the ordinal numbers. Forming them, there is a difference between the numbers from 1 to 19 and the numbers above:

    • numbers from 1 to 19: add -te to the number
    • numbers from above 19: add -ste to the number

    enlightenedIn English you usually jsut add the ending -th, while in German you either add -te or -ste.

    Cardinal number Ordinal number
    eins (one) erste (first)
    zwei (two) zweite (second)
    drei (three) dritte (third)
    vier (four) vierte (fourth)
    fünf (five) fünfte (fifth)
    zehn (ten) zehnte (tenth)
    einundzwanzig (twentyone) einundzwanzigste (twentyfirst)
    vierunddreißig (thirtyfour) vierunddreißigste (thirtyfourth)

     

    If you want to know more about ordinal numbers and especially their use as adjectives, have a look at the chapter about the forming and declension of ordinal numbers in German.

    yes You want to do some fun an free exercises to learn the numbers in German? Than try out the following three exercises!

    Exercises

    Counting in German: Fill in the Blanks Part 1

    Counting in German: Fill in the Blanks Part 2

    Counting in German: Multiple Choice Exercise