• Italian grammar
    0%
  • 1 Italian alphabet and pronunciation (letters,...)
  • 2 Function of Italian words (subject, object)
  • 3 Italian articles (the/a, an) [0/16]
  • 4 Italian numbers (cardinal, ordinal) [0/7]
  • 5 Italian nouns [0/13]
  • 6 Italian adjectives [0/17]
  • 6.1 Adjective agreement in Italian (endings) [0/2]
  • 6.2 Qualifying adjectives in Italian [0/3]
  • 6.3 Possessive adjectives in Italian (my, your, his/her...) [0/3]
  • 6.4 Demonstrative adjectives in Italian (this, that) [0/2]
  • 6.5 Indefinite adjectives in Italian (some, any...) [0/3]
  • 6.6 Numeral adjectives in Italian (one, the first...) [0/2]
  • 6.7 Interrogative adjectives in Italian (what/which,...) [0/2]
  • 6.8 List of adjectives in Italian (A-Z)
  • 7 Italian pronouns [0/28]
  • 7.1 Personal pronouns in Italian [0/6]
  • 7.2 Relative pronouns (who, that, which, ...) in Italian [0/4]
  • 7.3 Possessive pronouns in Italian (mine, yours, his, ...) [0/4]
  • 7.4 Demonstrative pronouns (this, that, ...) in Italian [0/3]
  • 7.5 Indefinite pronouns (few, some, many, ...) in Italian [0/4]
  • 7.6 Interrogative pronouns (who, what, which) in Italian [0/4]
  • 7.7 Reflexive pronouns in Italian (myself, each other) [0/3]
  • 8 Italian prepositions [0/25]
  • 8.1 Italian simple prepositions [0/20]
  • 8.1.1 Italian preposition "di" (of, from,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.2 Italian preposition "a" (at, to,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.3 Italian preposition "da" (by, from,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.4 Italian preposition "in" (in, to,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.5 Italian preposition "con" (with) [0/1]
  • 8.1.6 Italian preposition "su" (on, over,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.7 Italian preposition "per" (for, to,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.8 Italian prepositions "tra/ fra" (between, among,...) [0/1]
  • 8.1.9 "On" in Italian (su)
  • 8.1.10 "To" in Italian [0/4]
  • 8.1.11 Italian prepositions of place and time [0/3]
  • 8.1.12 Simple preposition chart - English to Italian [0/5]
  • 8.2 Italian articulated prepositions [0/3]
  • 8.3 Expressions with Italian prepositions [0/2]
  • 9 Italian adverbs [0/24]
  • 9.1 Italian adverbs of manner (good, bad, so) [0/4]
  • 9.2 Italian adverbs of frequency and time (always, now) [0/4]
  • 9.3 Italian adverbs of place (here, there) [0/4]
  • 9.4 Italian adverbs of quantity (more, nothing, enough) [0/3]
  • 9.5 Italian affirmation/negation adverbs (Yes, No, Neither) [0/4]
  • 9.6 Italian adverbs of doubt, interrogative/exclamative [0/5]
  • 10 Italian comparatives, superlatives (adjectives/adverbs) [0/7]
  • 11 Italian tenses and verb conjugation [0/17]
  • 11.1 Present tense in Italian (presente indicativo) [0/2]
  • 11.2 Past tenses in Italian [0/11]
  • 11.3 Future tenses in Italian [0/4]
  • 12 Italian verbs [0/94]
  • 12.1 Functions and classification of Italian verbs [0/1]
  • 12.2 Transitive and intransitive verbs in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.3 Active voice and passive voice in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4 Italian regular verbs [0/30]
  • 12.4.1 First conjugation in Italian (verbs ending in -are) [0/16]
  • Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the first conjugation (Score -/-)Free
  • 12.4.1.1 Conjugation of abitare (to dwell) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.2 Conjugation of amare (to love) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.3 Conjugation of giocare (to play) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.4 Conjugation of lavorare (to work) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.5 Conjugation of mangiare (to eat) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.6 Conjugation of parlare (to speak) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.7 Conjugation of studiare (to study) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.4.1.8 Conjugation of pagare (to pay) in Italian [0/1]
  • 12.4.2 Second conjugation in Italian (verbs ending in -ere) [0/6]
  • 12.4.3 Third conjugation in Italian (verbs ending in -ire) [0/8]
  • 12.5 Italian irregular verbs [0/38]
  • 12.5.1 Conjugation of irregular verbs ending in -are [0/8]
  • 12.5.2 Conjugation of irregular verbs ending in -ere [0/24]
  • 12.5.2.1 Conjugation of sapere (to know) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.2 Conjugation of leggere (to read) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.3 Conjugation of mettere (to put) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.4 Conjugation of piacere (to like) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.5 Conjugation of rimanere (to remain, to stay) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.6 Conjugation of conoscere (to know) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.7 Conjugation of scrivere (to write) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.8 Conjugation of vivere (to live) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.9 Conjugation of chiudere (to close, to shut) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.10 Conjugation of prendere (to take, to catch) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.11 Conjugation of bere (to drink) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.2.12 Conjugation of tenere (to hold, to keep) in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.5.3 Conjugation of irregular verbs ending in -ire [0/6]
  • 12.6 Italian modal verbs [0/6]
  • 12.7 Italian reflexive verbs [0/2]
  • 12.8 Verbi sovrabbondanti in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.9 Verbi difettivi in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.10 Verbi fraseologici in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.11 Verbi impersonali in Italian [0/2]
  • 12.12 Auxiliary verbs (essere, avere) in Italian [0/5]
  • 12.13 Verbs and prepositions in Italian
  • 13 Italian moods
  • 14 Indicative mood in Italian
  • 15 Subjunctive in Italian [0/9]
  • 16 Conditional in Italian [0/4]
  • 17 Infinitive in Italian [0/1]
  • 18 Imperative in Italian [0/3]
  • 19 Gerund in Italian [0/3]
  • 20 Present participle in Italian [0/1]
  • 21 Past participle in Italian [0/1]
  • 22 Italian sentences [0/15]
  • 22.1 Italian sentence structure (word order) [0/4]
  • 22.2 Structure of complex Italian sentences [0/4]
  • 22.3 Not in Italian (negation, negative sentences) [0/3]
  • 22.4 Italian interrogative sentences (questions) [0/1]
  • 22.5 Italian conditional sentences (if-clauses) [0/1]
  • 22.6 Italian passive sentences [0/1]
  • 22.7 Italian impersonal construction (Si impersonale) [0/1]
  • 23 Italian conjunctions [0/4]
  • To structure an Italian sentence correctly it's necessary to remember some basic rules, which we will soon go through in this lesson.
    Remember that the structure of a sentence is never really fixed, but rather changeable according to the communicative intentions of the speaker.

    If you want to avoid mistakes and sound like a native speaker, it's fundamental to read, listen, and also try to speak Italian as much as possible.

    Word order in Italian

    Let's analyze the main types of sentences used in everyday language.

    Affirmative sentences

    The core of a basic affirmative sentence is composed of three parts, in this order:

    enlightened Affirmative sentence: Subject + Verb + Object

    Example: Io (Subject) + parlo (Verb)  + con te (Object). (I talk with you)

    If you want to add more elements to a simple sentence, it will be necessary to respect additional word order rules, which are analyzed here Italian sentence structure (word order) and here Structure of complex Italian sentences.

     

    Study this lesson together with a teacher

    Studying on your own is not effective since nobody guides you and you do not receive any feedback. Ask help from one of our professional teachers!

    Get a free trial lesson!
    View teachers

    Negative sentences (Non)

    To form simple negative sentences it's necessary to add Non (Not) before the verb you want to negate.

    enlightened Negative sentence: Subject + Non + Verb + Object

    • AFFIRMATIVE:  Maria mangia il cioccolato. (Maria eats chocolate)
    • NEGATIVE: Maria non mangia il cioccolato. (Maria doesn't eat chocolate)

    If you want to know more, check out  Italian negative sentences (negation).

     

    Interrogative sentences

    To ask a question in Italian, you just need to use a rising intonation of your voice; the sentence structure remains unchanged.
    Don't forget to add a question mark at the end of a written sentence.

    enlightened Interrogative sentence: Same structure + Rising intonation + (Question mark)

    • AFFIRMATIVE: Marco è andato in montagna ieri. (Marco went to the mountains yesterday)
    • INTERROGATIVE: Marco è andato in montagna ieri? (Did Marco go to the mountains yesterday?)

    Wh- Questions

    If you want to ask a question with one of the so-called Wh-Questions, the sentence structure changes as follows:

    enlightened Wh- Questions: Interrogative adjective/adverb/pronoun + Verb + Subject

    To learn more, take a look at Italian interrogative sentences (questions).

     

    Italian conditional sentences (if-clauses)

    If-clauses are introduced by the adverb Se (If).

    The If-Clause can precede or follow the main clause.

    enlightened  If-clauses (1): Se + Clause + Comma + Main clause

    enlightened  If-clauses (2): Main clause + Se + Clause

    To learn more, check out Italian conditional sentences (if-clauses).

     

    Italian active and passive voice

    Active sentences

    The subject carries out the action expressed by the verb.

    enlightened  Active form: Subject + Verb + Direct object

    Passive sentences

    The action falls on the object, which is moved at the beginning of the sentence.

    enlightened Passive form: Direct object + Verb + [Preposition Da + Subject/Agent]

    The passive could also be built with Si and the following structure:

    enlightened Passive with Si: Si + Verb + Rest of the sentence

    To take a deeper look at this topic, go to Italian passive sentences.

     

    Italian impersonal construction

    These sentences don't have a specified subject, but are rather carried out by everyone, all.

    enlightened Impersonal form: Si + Verb + Rest of the sentence

    If you want to know more, go to Italian impersonal construction (Si impersonale).

    Next lessons

    1 Italian sentence structure (word order) Learn more about simple affirmative sentences in Italian.
    2 Structure of complex Italian sentences A lesson on complex affirmative Italian sentences.
    3 Not in Italian (negation, negative sentences) A lesson on the structure of Italian negative sentences.
    4 Italian interrogative sentences (questions) A lesson on the Italian interrogative structure.
    5 Italian conditional sentences (if-clauses) A lesson on Italian conditional sentences.
    6 Italian passive sentences A lesson on Italian passive sentences.
    7 Italian impersonal construction (Si impersonale) A lesson on Italian impersonal sentences.