• French grammar
    0%
  • 1 French alphabet
  • 2 French pronunciation and phonetics [0/7]
  • 3 Nature and function of French words [0/23]
  • Multiple choice exercise about the nature of French words (Score -/-)
  • Multiple choice questions about the function of French words (Score -/-)
  • 3.1 The subject in French [0/3]
  • 3.2 The apostrophe and apposition in French [0/2]
  • 3.3 The complement object in French [0/12]
  • 3.4 The circumstancial complement in French [0/2]
  • 3.5 The agent complement in French [0/2]
  • 4 French articles [0/9]
  • 5 French nouns [0/13]
  • 6 French pronouns [0/20]
  • Multiple choice questions about the pronouns in French (Score -/-)
  • 6.1 French personal pronouns - je, tu, il [0/3]
  • 6.2 French possessive pronouns - le mien, le tien [0/2]
  • 6.3 French reflexive pronouns - me, te, se [0/2]
  • 6.4 French demonstrative pronouns - celui, celle, ceux [0/2]
  • 6.5 French relative pronouns - qui, que, qu' [0/4]
  • 6.6 French indefinite pronouns - tout, chacun [0/2]
  • 6.7 French interrogative pronouns - qui, que, lequel [0/2]
  • 6.8 French adverbial pronouns - en, y [0/2]
  • 7 French adjectives [0/17]
  • Multiple choice questions about the epithet, attribute in French (Score -/-)
  • 7.1 Endings of regular and irregular French adjectives [0/3]
  • 7.2 Comparative and superlative of French adjectives [0/3]
  • 7.3 Placement of French adjectives [0/2]
  • 7.4 French possessive adjectives - mon, ton, son [0/4]
  • 7.5 French demonstrative adjectives - ce, cette [0/2]
  • 7.6 French indefinite adjectives - toutes, quelques [0/2]
  • 8 French adverbs [0/18]
  • 9 French prepositions [0/10]
  • 10 French verbs [0/135]
  • 10.1 Tenses and moods in French [0/63]
  • 10.1.1 Indicative in French [0/26]
  • 10.1.1.1 Present tense in French [0/2]
  • 10.1.1.2 Past tenses in French [0/13]
  • 10.1.1.3 Future tenses in French [0/11]
  • 10.1.2 Subjunctive in French (le Subjonctif) [0/11]
  • 10.1.3 Conditional in French (le conditionnel) [0/10]
  • 10.1.4 Imperative in French [0/3]
  • 10.1.5 Infinitive in French [0/4]
  • 10.1.6 Gerund in French [0/2]
  • 10.1.7 Present participle in French [0/3]
  • 10.1.8 Past participle in French [0/4]
  • 10.2 French auxiliary verbs (avoir, être) [0/11]
  • 10.3 Modal verbs in French [0/17]
  • Fill in the blank exercise for the modal verbs in French (Score -/-)
  • 10.3.1 Conjugation of pouvoir (can) in French [0/4]
  • 10.3.2 Conjugation of devoir (should) in French [0/4]
  • 10.3.3 conjugation of vouloir (want) in French [0/4]
  • 10.3.4 Conjugation of savoir (to know) in French [0/4]
  • 10.4 Passive voice in French [0/4]
  • 10.5 Reflexive verbs in French [0/4]
  • 10.6 Irregular verbs in French [0/24]
  • Fill in the blanks exercise of the irregular verbs in French (Score -/-)
  • Fill in the blanks exercise of the irregular verbs in French II (Score -/-)
  • 10.6.1 Conjugation of venir (to come) in French [0/4]
  • 10.6.2 conjugation of aller (to go) in French [0/4]
  • 10.6.3 conjugation of faire (to do) in French [0/4]
  • 10.6.4 conjugation of prendre (to take) in French [0/3]
  • 10.6.5 conjugation of voir (to see) in French [0/3]
  • 10.6.6 Conjugation of partir (to leave) in French [0/4]
  • 10.7 Regular verbs in French [0/8]
  • 10.8 Reported Speech in French [0/4]
  • 11 French sentence structure [0/25]
  • Multiple choice questions about the sentence structure in French (Score -/-)
  • 11.1 The phrases in French [0/5]
  • 11.2 The forms of phrases in French [0/7]
  • 11.3 The types of phrases in French [0/8]
  • 11.4 The propositions in French [0/4]
  • 12 French si clauses [0/3]
  • 13
  • French proper nouns

    What is a proper noun in French ? 

    A proper noun (French: un nom propre) is a word that allows to designate persons or objects of the same category. It is always written in capital letters and it does not necessarily have a precise meaning

    Some proper names are used with determinants: un, une, des, le, la, les etc...  except in some cases.

    List of French proper nouns ? 

    Here you will find an overview of proper nouns and the catergory they belong to: 

    Names and surnames Names of animals Names of cities, countries, objects, nationalities
    Pierre Felix Strasbourg
    Dupont Garfield La Loire
    Paul Dupont Hamtaro Le Mans
    Henri Rex La Tour Eiffel
    Jean-Pierre Rouky Les Écossais
    Victor Sam La France
    Sandra Lou Italie
    Marie Fili Le Colisée
    William Pilou Écosse
    Noé Zou London Bridge
    Jeanne Jim Californie
    Marc Monte Monaco
    Louis Lilu Muraille de Chine
    Selena Gary Australie

    When to use French proper nouns ? 

    Categories of proper nouns 

    Nouns can be used to designate a person or object in a unique and individual way. There are different categories:

    1. Surname and name of a person 

    • Je m'appelle Nicolas Anelka. (My name is Nicolas Anelka)

    2. Historical characters

    • La jeune guerrière s'appelait Jeanne d'Arc. (The young warrior's name was Joan of Arc)
    • Il était surnommé Napoleon III. (He was called Napoleon III)
    • J'adore l'histoire de Cléopatre. (I love the story of Cleopatra)

    ​3. Names of countries

    • Italie 
    • France 
    • Irlande 

    4. Names of regions

    • Texas
    • Latium
    • California
    • Angleterre du Nord-Est (North East England)

    5. Names of monuments

    • la Tour Eiffel (the Eiffel tower)
    • le Colisée (the Colloseum)
    • la Statue de la Liberté (the Statue of Liberty)
    • le musée du Louvre (the museum of Louvre)

    6. Names of godheads 

    • Bouddha
    • Dalai-Lama
    • Mohammed
    • Moïse
    • Jésus-Christ
    • Dieu 

    7. Titles of artworks, role plays

    • Roméo et Juliette (Romeo and Juliet)
    • les Misérables (the Miserables)
    • Guernica
    • la Joconde (Mona Lisa)

    8. Names of brands

    • Adidas 
    • Nike
    • Lacoste
    • Dior
    • Chanel 

    Plural of proper nouns

    As a general rule, proper nouns are invariable even if there is a plural determinant. But there are different rules regarding the plural of proper nouns:​

    • There are proper nouns that are composed, in this case, they do not take a capital letter but remain invariable.

    Exemple: J'ai mangé des Saint-Nectaire. I ate Saint-Nectaire (type of french cheese).

    • The proper nouns of dynasties agree in the plural.

    Exemple: les Tudors (The Tudors).

    Particularities and exceptions

    There are many particularities and exceptions that are important to consider:

    • Proper names are not attached to a determinant except for certain countries and area names, names of inhabitants, names of monuments, and titles of works.
    • The proper name almost always has a unique meaning, unlike common nouns.
    • Some literary style figures use proper nouns as common nouns (this is called an antonomase) and in this case, proper nouns can agree.
    • The names of days and months are not proper nouns, sp they can agree in the plural. 

    Examples 

    • les Français. (the French)
    • les Britanniques. (British people)
    • le Colisée (the Colosseum)
    • les Misérables (the Miserables)

    Exercises

    Fill in the blank exercise about the proper nouns

    Fill in the blank exercise about articles with proper nouns